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CNYC 2016

Are you prepared to handle a request from a resident for a week of filming in her apartment? Or a request to transfer a unit into trust ownership? What if a resident in your pet-free building claims to need a pot-bellied pig as a “comfort pet”?

Those scenarios could happen to you – whether you’re the unofficial “president for life” at your co-op or you’ve just been elected to the board of your condo. For 36 years, the Council of New York Cooperatives and Condominiums (CNYC) has been providing a venue for boards, shareholders, and unit-owners to meet with each other and with key professionals to learn of new laws, new procedures, new technologies, or simply to share insights. On Sunday, November 13, CNYC’s 36th annual conference offers each participant the opportunity to select from 75 classes that touch on virtually every aspect of operating New York cooperatives and condominiums today.

MORNING SESSIONS
Three-Hour Morning Classes
8:45 A.M. to 11:45 A.M.

1. CURRENT SIGNIFICANT LEGAL DECISIONS

Every year, CNYC president Marc Luxemburg examines recent court decisions, providing commentary and insights about how each case affects New York cooperatives and condominiums; he also suggests ways for boards to cope with new challenges that these cases raise. Luxemburg moves quickly through a great number of court cases in this advanced class, designed for experienced board members familiar with board functioning and for attorneys. Application is pending for Continuing Legal Education credit.

CLASS LEVEL Advanced

ATTENDING Board members, attorneys advising boards, and management personnel interested in latest court decisions affecting cooperatives and condominiums.

CONDOS ONLY

2. BOARD RESPONSIBILITIES IN CONDOMINIUMS

Attorney Linda Plotnicki will review the laws and legal documents governing a condominium and will discuss issues of general concern, ranging from house rules and their enforcement to protection of the income stream in default situations. What should the board do to ensure efficient day-to-day operation of the building? To effectively amend policies, bylaws, and rules and regulations of the condominium? To exercise some control over who lives in the condominium? What does the concept of a board member’s fiduciary duty really mean? Here you will find answers to these important condo questions.

CLASS LEVEL Basic

ATTENDING Board members and aspiring board members of condominiums and management personnel with condo clients.

CO-OPS ONLY

3. LEGAL RESPONSIBILITIES OF CO-OP BOARDS

Attorney Dennis Greenstein will discuss the concepts common to the functioning of all cooperatives, focusing on the proprietary lease and bylaws, court cases, and the responsibilities of directors, but also providing many practical suggestions and examples to guide participants to be able to function efficiently and to understand both the legal and the practical issues that boards frequently face. The class is packed full of information that you will not want to miss.

CLASS LEVEL Basic

ATTENDING Board members, aspiring board members of cooperatives, and attorneys and management personnel with co-op clients.

4. THE TREASURER

The co-op or condo treasurer oversees all financial activities. While the execution can be delegated to management or to investment advisors, the treasurer can never relinquish responsibility for ensuring that all is done. Accountants Jayson Prisand and Robert Mellina will enumerate and discuss the treasurer’s responsibilities, suggesting systems of control and practical, time-saving procedures. CPE Credit is available for accountants who take this class.

CLASS LEVEL Basic

ATTENDING Board members, aspiring board members, finance committee members, accountants, and management personnel.

5. HOW DOES YOUR BUILDING WORK?

Peter Grech is a past president of the Superintendents Technical Association and resident manager of a large cooperative. He will explain, in clear, non-technical terms, exactly how key building systems work. Participants will leave with a better understanding of the elevator, the boiler, the water tank, and other building systems. This overview will be interesting to all board members, people considering serving on the board, management personnel, and building staff members.

CLASS LEVEL Basic

ATTENDING Board members, aspiring board members, building operations committee members, and building staff and residents interested in learning how the various building systems work.

FOR HDFC COOPERATIVES ONLY

6. ASK UHAB: RESALE, PRICE CAPS, AND AFFORDABILITY

Housing Development Fund Corporaton (HDFC) cooperatives have been providing affordable housing throughout New York City for more than forty years, with subsidies and benefits such as property tax abatements and low-interest loans from the city, and technical assistance and training from UHAB. In this interactive class, UHAB staff members will discuss issues your limited-equity HDFC co-op may be facing relating to co-op’s policies, resale price caps, and maintaining affordability.

CLASS LEVEL Basic

ATTENDING Board members and aspiring board members of HDFC cooperatives, and attorneys and management personnel who work with HDFCs.

CO-OPS ONLY

7. REPAIRS IN A COOPERATIVE: WHO IS RESPONSIBLE FOR WHAT?

Is it the shareholder or the corporation that is responsible for a particular repair in a cooperative apartment? The answer is not always evident, but attorney Phyllis Weisberg and property manager Jim Miller will provide sound guidelines for delving this key issue. References will be made to appropriate portions of the proprietary lease, the by-laws and the law. Specific examples will be cited. Application is pending for Continuing Legal Education credit.

CLASS LEVEL Basic

ATTENDING Board members, aspiring board members, attorneys, and management personnel.

8. YOUR ROOF AND EXTERIOR WALLS

Masonry expert Maurice Schickler will discuss preservation of the building envelope, with slides to illustrate both problems and solutions. He will explain why and how leaks occur and what preventive measures are effective in deterring them, and will explain terminology and techniques to be aware of in supervising roof repair and replacement, pointing, masonry repairs, and waterproofing. He will also discuss Local Law 11 and the New York City building codes and how they apply to facade and roof work.

CLASS LEVEL Basic

ATTENDING Board members, aspiring board members, building operations committee members, and management personnel.

9. RESERVES: ACCUMULATING, INVESTING, AND SPENDING THEM

The reserve fund of a cooperative or condominium is the cushion protecting shareholders and unit-owners from sudden assessments or unanticipated jumps in carrying charges. It is a vital component of long-term plans for maintaining the building and upgrading systems as needed. Accountant Abe Kleiman will discuss reasons for establishing reserves, means of accumulating funds, and prudent ways to invest these assets while effectively addressing the needs of your cooperative or condominium. Attention will be paid to pertinent tax rulings and regulations. Participants will be expected to have a good basic knowledge of co-op or condo finances. Continuing Professional Education credit is available for accountants taking this class.

CLASS LEVEL Advanced

ATTENDING Board members, finance committee members, accountants, and management personnel.

MORNING SESSIONS
90-Minute Morning Classes
9:00 A.M. to 10:30 A.M.

CO-OPS AND CONDOS

A growing number of cooperatives and condominiums have made the decision to be smoke-free. They develop and enact policies with this target in mind. Issues can arise if smokers are in residence or if owners know that their guests may want to smoke. How will resale value be affected? Are there discrimination issues to consider? Joshua Berengarten will provide advice about implementing and enforcing a no smoking policy.

CLASS LEVEL Basic

ATTENDING Board members, aspiring board members, attorneys, and management personnel interested in addressing issues relating to smoking.

B. NEW CODES AND RULES IN NEW YORK CITY

Laws passed by the City Council and regulations promulgated by city agencies impose new responsibilities on building owners each year. In this annual session, architect Leon Geoxavier, who is a CNYC board member, brings participants up to date on the latest city requirements and their deadlines.

CLASS LEVEL Basic

ATTENDING Board members, aspiring board members, building operations committee members, and management personnel.

C. BOARD CONCERNS

RE: TRUST OWNERSHIP

Attorney Peter Massa will help board members and managing agents understand what concerns the board should address when an owner seeks to transfer a unit to (or purchase it by) a trust or other entity. What are the risks? What restrictions might the board want to consider imposing? What is the typical procedure a board should follow when an individual desires to transfer his or her apartment to a trust? Sample forms of agreement will be provided and discussed.

CLASS LEVEL Intermediate

ATTENDING Board members, shareholders and unit-owners considering trust ownership, management personnel, and attorneys.

D. WHAT SHOULD BE IN THE MINUTES?

The minutes of your board meetings are the official record of actions taken, policies established, and projects planned. Minutes are not the occasion for flowery prose; they are not enhanced by excessive detail. Every board member shares responsibility for ensuring that the minutes they approve accurately reflect the intentions of the board and do not contain any unnecessary information. Attorney Jeffrey Schwartz will help secretaries and aspiring secretaries develop clear, concise minutes for their cooperatives or condominiums.

CLASS LEVEL Basic

ATTENDING Board secretaries, aspiring secretaries, other board members, management personnel.

E. WHEN NEW BUILDINGS HAVE CONSTRUCTION DEFECTS

As owners take possession of their units in newly constructed condominiums and cooperatives and begin to work with their neighbors to organize, they often find defects in the construction of their building. Attorney Robert Braverman will provide sound advice on assessing these situations and making critical decisions on how to proceed in order to achieve the best possible results at the most reasonable cost.

CLASS LEVEL Basic

ATTENDING Residents and board members of new construction buildings where serious construction defects have been found; management personnel and attorneys who work with these buildings.

F. COPING WITH EXCESSIVE HOARDING

People who hoard collect things and fill their homes far beyond their capacity to manage them, potentially putting themselves, their neighbors, and their buildings at risk. Public awareness of the hazards of hoarding has been growing, and in 2013 the medical profession officially declared hoarding to be a ‘disorder’. Kristin P. Bergfeld is a nationally recognized expert working for decades with hoarders who are referred to her company by building managers, lawyers, and hospitals. She is an author of the nationally accepted and utilized Clutter-Hoarding Scale © ICD 2011. She will distribute copies of this scale, explain how to use it, and will discuss how buildings can remedy these often complicated situations. Attorney Marc Schneider will help explore legal issues for boards with residents who hoard.

CLASS LEVEL Basic

ATTENDING Board members, attorneys, and management personnel who face problems of hoarding.

MORNING SESSIONS
Two-Hour Morning Classes
9:30 A.M. to 11:30 A.M.

11. LEADERSHIP SKILLS FOR BOARD PRESIDENTS (ONLY!)

The leadership skills of the board president drive the success of the cooperative or condominium. Management consultant Arthur Davis will help participants examine what makes the position of president unique among board members, exploring the special demands placed on presidents in the changing political environment of their buildings, and helping participants become more effective decision-makers, team builders, motivators, and mediators, while guiding other directors toward becoming more responsive managers.

CLASS LEVEL Intermediate

ATTENDING Board presidents in New York cooperatives and condominiums.

DISCUSSION CLASS

12. ROLE OF THE MANAGING AGENT

Join property manager Harry Smith for a thorough review of a typical management contract and a basic discussion of the services buildings should reasonably expect from management. Bring your questions. Learn about best practices for high standards in the management field.

CLASS LEVEL Basic

ATTENDING Board members, aspiring board members, building operations committee members and management personnel.

13. NYC AND NYS ENERGY ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS AND POLICIES

The city and the state have committed to reducing greenhouse gas by 80 percent below their 2005 levels by 2050 to make New York more sustainable and resilient. To reach this goal, the city and the state offer guidance, incentive programs, and financing. CNYC board member Martha Sickles will moderate a panel discussion with Laura Tajima from the Mayor’s Office of Sustainability, Luke Surowiec from the NYC Retrofit Accelerator, a NYSERDA representative, Phil Madnick of Con Edison, and Louis Rizzo of National Grid. They will present brief overviews of policies and programs designed to meet this goal with the participation of residents, businesses and government. Supporting materials including program descriptions and applications will be available to get you started.

CLASS LEVEL Basic

ATTENDING Board members, aspiring board members, energy committee and green committee members, and management personnel.

CO-OPS ONLY

14. BASIC FINANCIAL ASPECTS OF COOPERATIVES

Accountant Michael Esposito will provide a careful analysis of budgets, management reports, and tax issues designed to help new treasurers and “non-financial” board members fully understand their responsibilities. Once the basics are covered, if time permits, the discussion will turn to issues such as long-range planning, mortgage refinancing, and contingency reserves. With class No. 214 on financial statements, this class provides a detailed overview of financial issues. CPE Credit is available for accountants who take this class.

CLASS LEVEL Basic

ATTENDING Teasurers and other board members, aspiring treasurers, finance committee members, accountants and management personnel.

15. CURTAILING FRAUD AND CORRUPTION

Forensic accountant Mindy Eisenberg Stark and attorney Robert Mayes will offer guidelines for detecting wrongdoing in your building and will suggest preventive measures designed to help maximize the board’s effectiveness in controlling management and supervising building personnel. Continuing Professional Education credit is available for accountants who take this class.

CLASS LEVEL Advanced

ATTENDING Board members, aspiring board members, shareholders, unit-owners, attorneys, accountants, and management personnel who work with cooperatives and condominiums.

16. ADDRESSING RENOVATION REQUESTS

Shareholders and unit-owners will often submit renovation plans to the Board which are problematic, either because they do not conform to code or because their implementation would have a potentially adverse impact upon neighbors or the building’s operation. Under these circumstances the board has the right to say “no” to all or parts of renovation proposals, or to require modifications to the plans presented. Attorneys Bruce Cholst and Alfred Taffae and architects Oswald Bertolini and Eric Vonderhyde will guide participants in a discussion of renovation policies and procedures, the types of requests that are typically problematic and why, and suggestions on how to deal with them. Application is pending for Continuing Legal Education credit.

CLASS LEVEL Basic

ATTENDING Board members, architects, attorneys, and management personnel who deal with renovation requests.

CO-OPS ONLY

17. SUBLET ISSUES IN NEW YORK COOPERATIVES

Many cooperatives periodically review their sublet, admissions, and “guest” policies to ensure a consistently balanced approach to the changing needs of the building and its shareholders. Attorney Morton H. Rosen will examine subletting both from the point of view of the board of directors and that of shareholders who may wish to sublet. He will help participants consider procedures for reviewing sublet candidates and sublet fees. The class will also explore restrictions and conditions that boards might consider imposing in sublet situations, including short-term sublets. The law and possible board policies with respect to occupancy by “guests” and “roommates” will also be discussed.

CLASS LEVEL Basic

ATTENDING Board members, admissions committee members, attorneys, and management personnel for housing cooperatives.

18. ALL ABOUT HOUSE RULES

Every cooperative and condominium starts its existence with a set of boilerplate house rules. Over time these can be updated or amended as new building policies are instituted. Attorney Peter Livingston will discuss the role of house rules in a cooperative or condominium, their relationship to other corporate documents, how to change house rules, and ways to make sure that everyone knows what the house rules are. Examples of what belongs or does not belong in the house rules will also be discussed.

CLASS LEVEL Basic

ATTENDING Board members, aspiring board members, attorneys, and management personnel.

MORNING SESSIONS
75-Minute Morning Classes
10:45 A.M. to 12:00 P.M.

J. CONSIDERATIONS BEFORE SIGNING THE LOCAL LAW 11 FISP REPORT

Work required by Local Law 11 reports is frequently expensive and sometimes not necessary. Architect Douglas Lister will help participants view the façade inspection requirements in perspective of the larger categories of long-term building maintenance and capital improvements.

CLASS LEVEL Basic

ATTENDING Board members, building operations committee members, architects, and management personnel.

DISCUSSION CLASS

K. COMMITTEES TO HELP RUN YOUR BUILDING

Anyone who has served on a board knows how time-consuming, even overwhelming, the workload can be. Attorney Theresa Racht will lead a discussion on how the effective use of committees can actually ease the board’s workload as well as provide a mechanism to move controversy outside board meetings, so that decision-making during board meetings is easier.

CLASS LEVEL Basic

ATTENDING Board members, aspiring board members, aspiring committee members, and management personnel.

L. LITTLE AMENITIES AND LUXURIES

The budget of your condominium or cooperative may not allow for a major improvement like the gym you’re dreaming of, but there are many small changes you can make that may lift spirits and enhance quality of life. Architect Leon Geoxavier, who is a member of the board of CNYC and president of his cooperative, will help you begin thinking about a cart for packages at the front door, or an air pump for the bicycle room, or your building name or address on a thick, new doormat.

CLASS LEVEL Basic

ATTENDING Board members, house committee members, management personnel, and interested residents.

M. CAN YOUR BUILDING HARNESS SOLAR ENERGY?

Could your building begin using the sun’s energy to produce electricity, heat, or hot water? How does it work? What might it cost? Noah Ginsburg of Solar One and Thomas Gately of Green Power Solutions will discuss solar options available today and incentive programs available to help defray their cost.

CLASS LEVEL Basic

ATTENDING Board members, operations committee members, green committee members, management personnel, and interested residents.

CONDOS ONLY

N. HOW TO IMPROVE YOUR CONDO BYLAWS

Many condominiums continue to use their decades-old original bylaws even though they were written by the sponsor and did not take into consideration many of the challenges of condo governance. In this class, attorneys Andrew Brucker and Christian Daglieri will point out problem areas in typical New York City bylaws, and will suggest remedies for these problems. Further, they will address current situations which are not even considered in the old form of bylaws. Application is pending for Continuing Legal Education credit.

CLASS LEVEL Basic

ATTENDING Condo board members, unit-owners, attorneys, and management personnel who work with condominiums.

O. CHALLENGES OF CONVERTING TO GAS HEAT

More and more co-op and condo boards are considering converting their buildings’ heating systems from oil to gas or to a combined oil/gas system. Engineer Peter Varsalona and consultant Gregory Carlson will discuss the challenges and costs of converting, including estimated savings and expected payback time, the need for a feasibility study, design considerations, construction phase steps, the installation of a chimney liner/extension, coordinating service with the utility company, and incentive programs available to help defray the costs of the conversion.

CLASS LEVEL Basic

ATTENDING Board members, building operations committee members, green committee members, and management personnel.

Midday SESSIONS
90-Minute Midday Classes
12:15 P.M. to 1:45 P.M.

101. ARE REPORTS OF THE DEMISE OF THE BUSINESS JUDGMENT RULE PREMATURE?

CNYC president Marc Luxemburg will review what the Business Judgment Rule is and how it was apparently intended to function by the court of appeals. He will go on to discuss how it is actually functioning in the courts today, and the implications these changes have for decision-making by boards in order to justify their actions when they are challenged in court (which is happening with more and more frequency). Application is pending for Continuing Legal Education credit.

CLASS LEVEL Advanced

ATTENDING Board members, attorneys, and management personnel.

102. CREATING A POLICY MANUAL FOR YOUR CO-OP OR CONDO

How does a cooperative or condominium maintain consistency in its rules and interpretation of its proprietary lease, declaration of the condominium, bylaws, or house rules when boards and management change over time? How can residents know the rules as they have evolved over the years? Coordinate all this information in one place, eliminate the inconsistencies, make certain that the rules still make sense, and you have a policy manual specific to your cooperative or condominium. Present it in a “user-friendly” format and in easy-to-read style and your shareholders or unit-owners will have an excellent reference source when questions arise. CNYC board chair Stuart Saft and attorney Jacqueline Debbs will start you on the path to developing a policy manual for your own cooperative or condominium.

CLASS LEVEL Basic

ATTENDING Board members, residents, attorneys, and management personnell.

CO-OPS ONLY

103. CO-OP SHAREHOLDER VS. BOARD REMEDY ISSUES WITH WATER PENETRATION, MOLD, BEDBUGS, NOISE, AND ODORS

When costs are incurred because of water penetration, removing mold, eradicating bedbugs, or controlling noise and odors in shareholder apartments, the cooperative must walk a careful line in distinguishing its responsibilities from those of the shareholder. Numerous concepts come into play, including city and state laws such as the statutory concept of the warranty of habitability, the building’s proprietary lease, principles of common law negligence, and the policies in effect in the specific cooperative. Attorney Arthur Weinstein, who is a founder and vice president of CNYC, will explore the complexities of these issues. Participants will be expected to have a clear understanding of the functioning of a cooperative. Application is pending for Continuing Legal Education credit.

CLASS LEVEL Advanced

ATTENDING Board members, aspiring board members, shareholders, attorneys, management personnel.

104. PROPERTY TAX UPDATE

Homeowners in cooperatives and condominiums have benefitted from a property tax abatement program that was put in place in 1997 and modified in 2013, so that now higher abatement percentages go to buildings valued at less than $60,000 per unit, and the abatement program is limited to an individual’s primary residence (plus up to two additional units in the same cooperative or condominium as the primary residence). CNYC and its Action Committee for Reasonable Real Estate Taxes continue to work for permanent reform of the city’s property tax system. Action Committee Chairman Jim Rheingrover and certiorari attorney Eric Weiss will provide an update on the abatement program which ends on June 30, 2019, and will answer questions about this and other city tax abatement and exemption programs.

CLASS LEVEL Basic

ATTENDING Board members, finance committee members, accountants, and management personnel.

DISCUSSION CLASS

105. EXPLORING ETHICAL CHALLENGES

Board members must always act in the best interests of their cooperatives or condominiums. A board position should never be used for personal gain or to promote the interests of self, family, friends, or business associates. Each board member should disclose any relationship with vendors, prospective purchasers, and other interested parties. When a board has a code of ethics, this will clearly define these responsibilities in terms of confidentiality, conflict of interest, and good faith. Consultants Linda Brockway and Greg Carlson will lead a discussion of ethical dilemmas that boards and individual board members may face.

CLASS LEVEL Basic

ATTENDING Board members, aspiring board members, building residents, and management personnel.

HDFC Focus

106. NEW HPD REGULATIONS FOR HDFCs: WHAT’S COMING NEXT?

Attorneys Lawrence McGaughey and Brooklyn Law School professor Debra Bechtel will review the new HPD requirements, designed to ensure that HDFCs provide permanently affordable housing, with practical suggestions for buildings where this means major changes in past policies.

CLASS LEVEL Basic

ATTENDING Board members and aspiring board members of HDFC cooperatives, attorneys, and management personnel who work with HDFCs.

107. ONBOARDING NEW BOARD MEMBERS

Newly elected board members need solid instruction and training to understand their roles and fiduciary duties. Operating a cooperative or condominium involves many of the same responsibilities as any other business, yet board members are volunteers who may not have experience in such matters. A proactive approach to onboarding new members sets the tone and positions the entire board for success. Management companies are an important partner in empowering new board members and helping them learn the ropes. Property manager Dan Wurtzel will walk participants through best practices of onboarding new members.

CLASS LEVEL Basic

ATTENDING Board members, aspiring board members, and management personnel.

108. A GREEN ROOF FOR YOUR BUILDING

Green roofs provide many benefits. They add usable space to the roof, extend the life of roofing membranes, lower heating and cooling costs, reduce stormwater runoff, and increase a building’s property value. LEED AP Yessica Marinez will address the issues involved in installing a green roof, including structural and waterproofing considerations, maintenance costs, roofing warranties, code compliance, and zoning restrictions. Green roof specialist Michael DiMezza will discuss which types of systems and plantings are most suitable for green roofs.

CLASS LEVEL Basic

ATTENDING Board members, house committee members, building operations committee members, management personnel, and architects.

109. ADDRESSING PROBLEMS AS RESIDENTS AGE IN PLACE

New York City cooperatives and condominiums often have infirm or disabled residents who are “aging in place.” Family members, living at a distance, may not be not fully aware of their elderly relatives’ issues. In this class, Aging Life Care Manager Susan Birenbaum will offer practical and compassionate guidance for the board and the property manager when problems arise, and proactive suggestions to facilitate solutions.

CLASS LEVEL Basic

ATTENDING Interested board and house committee members.

DISCUSSION CLASS

110. ASK THE CONSTRUCTION ATTORNEY

Bring your questions when you meet with construction attorney C. Jaye Berger, so that she may help you avoid having a renovation disaster in your building. Berger will use real-life examples and explain what to look for when selecting a contractor, key provisions in contracts, how to negotiate these provisions, insurance issues, mechanic’s liens, subcontractors, and managing the construction process. She will discuss keys to successfully completing a project and suggest ways to avoid common legal problems that can arise between the cooperative or condominium and contractors, shareholders, and unit-owners.

CLASS LEVEL Basic

ATTENDING Board members, building operations committee members, and management personnel.

111. BOARD CONCERNS, RE: SHORT-TERM RENTALS

The internet age and the “shared economy” have resulted in frequent cases of unknown individuals arriving to live in cooperative or condominium units without guest procedures having been followed or board permission received. There is potential danger to the residents and to the “guests” in these situations. Property managers Dawn Dickstein and Michael Mintz, attorneys Jennifer Ecker and Peter Livingston, and search expert Ari Teman will help you develop procedures for identifying and dealing with short-term rentals in your building. How will you deal with a resident who is truly a host and will be there to supervise paying guests? Will your building ever allow such activity when the unit-owner is absent? It is never too soon to consider this important issue, develop building policies and procedures, and make sure that your residents understand their importance for everyone’s security.

CLASS LEVEL Basic

ATTENDING Board members, aspiring board members, attorneys, and management personnel.

112. MANAGEMENT TRANSITIONS

Like any other relationship, the one your building has with its management firm can become strained. Discussion may bring solutions to the problems, or you may determine that the relationship cannot be salvaged. But transitions to new management aren’t always smooth. Accountant Mindy Eisenberg Stark and attorney Jeff Schwartz will lead a discussion of how to shop for and select the firm and agent that are right for your cooperative or condominium; what contract provisions will help define the expectations of both parties; and how to optimize the possibility that records and documents all reach the new management firm promptly and in good order.

CLASS LEVEL Basic

ATTENDING Board members and building operations committee members.

113. SUCCESSFUL ENERGY PROJECTS: SCOPE AND PROCESS

In this overview of factors common to successful energy projects, panelists Martha Sickles, Posie Constable, Tom Sahagian, and Barry Korn will discuss a range of projects from simple retrofits using prescriptive utility programs to more complex projects with multiple-system replacements and distributed generation.

CLASS LEVEL Basic

ATTENDING Board members, green committee members, building operations committee members, and management personnel interested in energy efficiency.

114. A RESERVE STUDY FOR YOUR COOPERATIVE OR CONDOMINIUM

A reserve study is a procedure that helps boards plan for the ongoing repairs and replacements of building systems. Many lenders, particularly those making loans for condominiums, will ask to see such a study. Engineer Mitchell Frumkin will discuss what a reserve study involves, how it is prepared, and how it should be reviewed and regularly updated by the board to confirm that it reflects accurately their building’s plans.

CLASS LEVEL Basic

ATTENDING Board and building operations committee members, and management personnel.

115. WINDOW ISSUES

Architect Douglas Lister and property manager Neil Davidowitz will review board policies on the subject of windows, and discuss replacement and repairs. Many window controversies can be avoided if the board has clear guidelines for residents to use when repairing or replacing windows and air conditioners. The class will offer advice on preparing these guidelines. It will also explain the difference between a $350 replacement window and a $2,500 replacement window, and will suggest strategies for replacing or repairing windows in historic buildings.

CLASS LEVEL Basic

ATTENDING Board members, building operations committee members, and management personnel.

DISCUSSION CLASS

116. DISCUSSION GROUP FOR SMALL SELF-MANAGED BUILDINGS

Here is an opportunity for discussion of topics of general interest to board members of small, self-managed buildings. CNYC board member Marleen Levi and HDFC expert Hilary Glaus will lead an interactive discussion where advice will be shared, and clues to solve your problems may well come from a fellow class participant. Bring your questions and be prepared to share your insights. This class is limited to residents of small, self-managed buildings only.

CLASS LEVEL Basic

ATTENDING Board members, aspiring board members, and residents of small, self-managed cooperatives and condominiums.

117. IMPROVING RECYCLING IN NYC APARTMENT BUILDINGS

Help make the city cleaner and greener one building at a time, starting with your own. Ashlee Barker of the New York City Department of Sanitation’s Apartment Building Programs will present opportunities for personalized recycling assistance for your building, convenient clothing recycling, and easy ways to handle e-waste. She will also share information on organics collection and other programs from the sanitation department.

CLASS LEVEL Basic

ATTENDING Board members, green committee members, building staff, and management personnel.

118. LIGHTS! CAMERA! ACTION! FILMING AT YOUR BUILDING

New York is a media-friendly town, with films, TV episodes and commercials being shot on location all the time. What if your building -– or its façade, or an apartment -– were to be one of these locations? What types of fees are typically paid? Do you need a professional to negotiate on your behalf? Are there risks? What will your residents think of this idea? Isabelle Wedemeyer has helped her cooperative to be frequently seen on television and in films. She will lead a panel discussion of experts ready to help with the technical as well as the human issues that arise when cooperatives and condominiums consider having photo shoots and filming in their buildings.

CLASS LEVEL Basic

ATTENDING Board members and residents interested in the possibility of filming in their building, management personnel interested in details of such a project.

119. SUCCESSFUL REDECORATION OF PUBLIC SPACE

The first impression of your building is conveyed by its public space. A well-designed lobby and hallways have a positive effect on the quality of life of every resident. Prospective purchasers react positively too. Selecting and executing the appropriate new design depends on a strategically planned process, which interior designer Jonathan Baron will explore in this class, guiding participants through key steps that result in successful renovations of lobbies, hallways, elevator cabs, mailrooms, and building entrances. Clear and timely communications to residents at every step of the way are vital to attaining consensus for the lobby design as well as fostering their patience and cooperation with the inevitable inconveniences of construction.

CLASS LEVEL Basic

ATTENDING Board members, house committee members, and management personnel.

CO-OPS ONLY

120. HOW TO IMPROVE YOUR CO-OP BYLAWS

Does your cooperative still use the original bylaws written by the sponsor decades ago? Do they address all the challenges of co-op governance that you face? In this class, attorneys Andrew Brucker and Christian Daglieri will discuss problem areas in typical New York City bylaws and will offer suggestions to remedy these problems. Further, they will have advice on current situations which are not even considered in the old form of bylaws. Application is pending for Continuing Legal Education credit.

CLASS LEVEL Basic

ATTENDING Board members, attorneys, and management personnel.

121. EVALUATING BOARD PERFORMANCE

It is wise for a board to review and evaluate its own performance periodically – with the goal always of improving both the way it functions and the way it is perceived by its “constituents” in the condominium or cooperative. Some buildings, particularly smaller ones, may bring all shareholders together for a constructive evaluation session of board performance. Join long-term board member Ed Yaker, who is also co-chair of the Coordinating Council of Cooperatives, for an interactive session on evaluating board performance, including a sample evaluation form and board resource material.

CLASS LEVEL Basic

ATTENDING Board members, aspiring board members, and management personnel.

CONDOS ONLY

122. TRANSFER FEES (“FLIP TAXES”)

FOR YOUR CONDO

Transfer fees have proven to be an effective means of funding reserves. Attorney Stuart Wachs, property manager Irwin Cohen, and accountant Carl Cesarano have practical advice for condominium boards interested in enacting transfer fees.

CLASS LEVEL Basic

ATTENDING Board members of condominiums, attorneys and management personnel.

DISCUSSION CLASS

123. TREASURERS FORUM

Accountants Annette Murray and Tom Pedersen invite building treasurers to discuss their responsibilities, expand their insights, share their concerns, and work together to address problem issues in an interactive session designed for the experienced building treasurer.

CLASS LEVEL Intermediate

ATTENDING Treasurers.

Afternoon SESSIONS
Two-Hour Afternoon Classes
2:30 P.M. to 4:30 P.M.

201. DEALING WITH DIFFICULT RESIDENTS

Every building is challenged by demands of difficult residents – people who are convinced that they are exempt from all rules; who renovate their apartments without permission; who park in others’ spaces; who send unauthorized guests to use the apartment in their absence; or those whose cluttered units invite vermin infestation or fire; or the people who disrupt meetings and bombard the board with angry questions, but refuse to listen to or accept the answers; those whose maintenance is chronically late, but who still expect very prompt service whenever they have a problem; and people who think the board is their employee. CNYC Board Chairman Stuart Saft and attorney Jacqueline Debbs will suggest creative and effective ways to deal with difficult residents.

CLASS LEVEL Basic

ATTENDING Board members, shareholder relations committee members, attorneys, and management personnel.

202. CO-OP ADMISSIONS POLICY AND PROCEDURES

CNYC co-founder and vice president Arthur I. Weinstein and property manager Eric Kaplan will detail the responsibilities of the board of directors and the admissions committee in establishing criteria and reviewing applications for the purchase of shares for units in a cooperative. Various housing discrimination laws will be reviewed in detail. Sublet policy will be touched upon briefly in this session, but it is also the subject of a separate class (No. 17). CNYC’s prototype application form will be distributed and discussed. Application is pending for Continuing Legal Education credit.

CLASS LEVEL Basic

ATTENDING Co-op board members and aspiring board members, attorneys, and management personnel.

DISCUSSION CLASS

203. EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS FOR YOUR CONDO OR CO-OP

Emergencies can have many forms: vandalism, natural disasters, fire, mechanical failures, sick or injured residents, acts of terror. Today’s cooperative and condominium boards and the professionals who work with them must consider these possibilities (and more!) as they prepare to cope swiftly and efficiently with whatever problems may befall their community. Advance preparation will include adequate insurance coverage, careful plans, and good communication to residents, encouraging them to make their own family plans for emergencies. Mary Fischer is the president of the board of a large cooperative and a CNYC board member. She and property manager Steven Greenbaum will lead a discussion designed to help you expand and perfect the contingency planning for your cooperative or condominium.

CLASS LEVEL Basic

ATTENDING Board members, safety committee members, and management personnel.

204. CONTROLLING VARIABLE COSTS

Many of the costs of operating our buildings appear completely beyond our control, but significant savings can be effectuated through a careful review and monitoring of all building expenditures. In this step-by-step class, property manager Mark Hoffman and CNYC board member Ted Procas, who is chairman of the Association of Riverdale Cooperatives, will review typical building expenses and will share secrets for containing runaway budgets.

CLASS LEVEL Basic

ATTENDING Board members, finance committee members, building operations committee members, house committee members, and management personnel.

DISCUSSION CLASS

205. YOUR TICKLER LIST OF ANNUAL TASKS

Architect Leon Geoxavier will help you develop a comprehensive list of the many tasks to be performed, forms to file, and inspections to undergo to ensure the smooth functioning of your cooperative or condominium, no matter what its size. As items are raised, discussion will be encouraged regarding how responsibilities are distributed and verification mechanisms established.

CLASS LEVEL Basic

ATTENDING Board members, house committee members, building operations committee members, and management personnel.

DISCUSSION CLASS

HDFC MEMBERS ONLY

206. ASK UHAB: GOVERNANCE AND COMPLIANCE WITH CITY RULES, LAWS, AND REGULATIONS

Housing Development Fund Corporation (HDFC) cooperatives have been providing affordable housing throughout New York City for more than 40 years, with subsidies and benefits such as property tax abatements and low-interest loans from the city, and technical assistance and training from UHAB. In this interactive class, UHAB staff members will discuss issues your limited-equity HDFC co-op may be facing relating to matters of governance and compliance with codes as well as regulatory and monitoring agreements.

CLASS LEVEL Basic

ATTENDING Board members, aspiring board members of HDFC cooperatives, and attorneys and management personnel who work with HDFCs.

207. INSURANCE GUIDELINES FOR YOUR BUILDING AND RESIDENTS

Insurance expert Patricia Batih and attorney Adam Finkelstein will review the full range of insurance coverages necessary to a typical building and each of its residents. They will discuss the cost of insurance and will suggest ways a building can maintain appropriate coverage.

CLASS LEVEL Basic

ATTENDING Board members, finance committee members, and management personnel.

208. EFFECTIVE CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTS

No capital project should ever be undertaken before a carefully constructed contract has been finalized by legal counsel. The American Institute of Architects (AIA) A101/A201 contract is widely considered the standard starting point in the building industry, but most attorneys and architects believe some modifications to that contract template are needed to better protect the board’s interests. Architect Stephen Varone and attorney Andrew Brucke will provide insights into critical/controversial clauses in this standard AIA contract, with suggestions on how best to handle each issue. Participants will leave with many tips toward effective contract preparation.

CLASS LEVEL Basic

ATTENDING Board members, building operations committee members, attorneys, architects, and management personnel.

CO-OPS ONLY

209. REFINANCING COOPERATIVE UNDERLYING MORTGAGES

Attorney Theresa Racht will moderate a seminar exploring diverse aspects of refinancing underlying mortgages on cooperative buildings, with the help of accountant Mindy Eisenberg Stark, property manager David Lipson, and mortgage broker Gregg Winter. The session will begin with a careful look at mortgage basics, including guidance about prerequisites, costs, preparation, and obligations, and will include suggestions for maximizing your building’s borrowing power.

CLASS LEVEL Basic

ATTENDING Board members, finance committee members, and management personnel.

210. KEEPING RESIDENTS INFORMED

In today’s information-focused world, shareholders and unit-owners expect to be kept informed and to have procedures for bringing their questions to the attention of building staff, management, and board members. Communications professional Lloyd Chrein, attorney Ronald Jay Gold, and property manager Mark Levine will present ways to maintain open and effective lines of communication, including written communications, social media, and on-site communication techniques.

CLASS LEVEL Basic

ATTENDING Board members, communications and house committee members, and management personnel.

CO-OPS ONLY

211. TRANSFER FEES (“FLIP TAXES”) FOR YOUR COOPERATIVE

Transfer fees are generally collected from a seller as a unit changes hands. These funds will help defray the cost of building improvements and therefore help contain the cost of operations. Instituting or changing transfer fees typically requires amending the corporate documents, with the requisite majority or supermajority vote. Property manager Irwin Cohen, accountant Carl Cesarano, and attorney Stuart Wachs will explore benefits, drawbacks, and market expectations with regard to the roles of buyers, sellers, lenders, brokers and attorneys in addressing transfer fees.

CLASS LEVEL Basic

ATTENDING Board members, management personnel, and shareholders interested in instituting transfer fees.

DISCUSSION CLASS

212. EFFECTIVE INTERFACE BETWEEN BOARD AND MANAGEMENT

If boards are to enjoy a successful, productive, and professional relationship with their property managers, they must establish the foundation to work in concert. Essential components include active communication, common understanding, and shared goals. CNYC board members Marleen Levi and Gregory Carlson will lead a discussion that focuses on identifying, developing, implementing, and adapting work styles that yield result-oriented interaction between board and management. Participants will be expected to have a clear understanding of how boards function.

CLASS LEVEL Intermediate

ATTENDING Board members and management personnel.

213. NEW TECHNOLOGIES AND METHODS TO PROMOTE SUSTAINABILITY, RESILIENCY, AND COST REDUCTION

Energy expert Lewis M. Kwit will conduct a program on cutting-edge technologies that are ready for prime time. Technologies to be showcased and demonstrated include cogeneration to produce on-site electricity, elevators that “capture gravity” to generate electricity, renewable resources for the urban environment, and advanced electric metering technologies. Presenters will include architect Haym Gross, host of the Solar Salon NYC forum; electrical equipment manufacturer Harold Jacobs; and cogeneration expert Gita Subramony.

CLASS LEVEL Basic

ATTENDING Board members, green committee members, building operations committee members, building staff and management personnel, and others interested in energy improvements.

CO-OPS ONLY

214. UNDERSTANDING YOUR CO-OP’S AUDITED FINANCIAL STATEMENT

Accountant Michael Esposito will walk you through a line-by-line review of financial statements for cooperatives, discussing issues related to each item. This session is designed to introduce new treasurers and interested board members to the basics of co-op financial statements. With #14, it will provide a detailed overview of the financial responsibilities of the co-op Board of Directors. Continuing Professional Education credit is available for accountants who take this class.

CLASS LEVEL Basic

ATTENDING Board members, shareholders, finance committee members, accountants, and management personnel

215. SENIORS IN THE SPOTLIGHT

Are there senior shareholders in your co-op/condo unable to care for themselves? Are there others with shaky finances? Simultaneously, are there seniors sharing (or ready to share) their strategies that have transformed their buildings from staid environments to ones which attract shareholders of all ages? Come and hear how senior activists Barbara Gottileb, Evelyn Jones Rich, Rochelle Shereff, and Fredda Vladeck have addressed these challenges and many more at Lincoln Towers, Lincoln Guild, and in Naturally Occurring Retirement Communities (NORCs) across the city.
CLASS LEVEL Basic

ATTENDING Board members, building residents, management personnel interested in helping seniors and tapping the abilities and insights of seniors in their cooperatives and condominiums.

216. THE BUDGET

Every well-run cooperative or condominium develops an annual budget to govern spending and to determine the amount of carrying charges that must be collected from each shareholder or unit-owner. The building manager, the accountant, and the treasurer should all participate in the development of your budget. Accountant Steven Beer will offer insights to help you establish and monitor a prudent budget and will provide tips to smooth out the impact of large seasonal expenses such as fuel and periodic ones (taxes, insurance, etc). Continuing Professional Education credit is available for accountants who take this class.

CLASS LEVEL Basic


ATTENDING Board members, finance committee members, accountants, and management personnel.

217. REASONABLE ACCOMMODATIONS: WHAT IS YOUR BUILDING REQUIRED TO DO?

Attorney Marc H. Schneider will discuss what your board should do when it receives a request for an accommodation or modification of the building based upon a medical necessity. His presentation will analyze the various laws applicable to such requests including the Fair Housing Act, the New York State Human Rights Law, and the New York City Human Rights Laws. Schneider will share advice to help your board avoid lawsuits and discrimination claims. He will discuss what to do when the request is first made; what can and what cannot be asked of the person making the request. He will also discuss who pays for any costs related to compliance with the request. Can a fee be charged for an accommodation? What should the board do if a formal complaint is filed? Is the claim covered by insurance? Plus other issues that boards face in connection with a request.

CLASS LEVEL Basic

ATTENDING Board members, attorneys, and management personnel.

218. ENFORCING THE RULES

A board’s power to impose rules on its community residents is the quintessential feature of cooperative and condominium living. Unfortunately, the exercise of that power often results in acrimony and costly litigation. Attorney Bruce Cholst will discuss strategies for enforcing the rules while minimizing tension and the prospect of litigation. If litigation is unavoidable, he will also explore a board’s powers and legal remedies in compelling ompliance with their regulations. Bring along your house rules and horror stories to help make this an informative and interactive class. Application is pending for Continuing Legal Education credit for this class.

CLASS LEVEL Basic

ATTENDING Board members, aspiring board members, attorneys, and management personnel.

219. AMENITIES TO ENHANCE YOUR BUILDING

Building amenities benefit residents in many ways. Enhanced “curb appeal” and more facilities in the building foster a sense of community and enhance the quality of life. These same factors increase apartment value. Property manager Neil Davidowitz will lead a session on amenity options; it will cover methods for establishing priorities and effective ways to get resident input on the decision, and will then proceed from decision to implementation, including suggestions on applicable designs, budgets, fees, construction, and policies and procedures for the use of the new amenity. Architect Dennis Mele and storage expert Josh Goldman will provide insights regarding these amenities.

CLASS LEVEL Basic

ATTENDING Board members, house committee members, management personnel.

220. YOUR BUILDING’S SUPPORT TEAM: SUPER AND STAFF

Cooperatives and condominiums rely on staff to protect the building and its residents and to keep the physical plant running smoothly under the guidance of the superintendent. When things are not working as well as the board would like, advice and help are available through the Realty Advisory Board on Labor Relations, Inc. (RAB), which represents property owners in their dealings with service employees – both for day-to-day issues and in the negotiation and administration of contracts. RAB attorneys will suggest effective ways to deploy, motivate and, when necessary, discipline building employees, including a discussion of realistic expectations for your Super’s performance. Margie Russell, executive director of the New York Association of Realty Managers (NYARM) will provide insights on training staff, and suggestions for enhancing performance while also enhancing employee satisfaction.

CLASS LEVEL Basic

ATTENDING Board members, personnel committee members and management personnel.

221. NOISE COMPLAINTS: LEGAL AND INSURANCE PERSPECTIVES

Noise complaints constitute a significant portion of quality of life issues for residents within cooperatives and condominiums. This course will explore how boards and management can address noise complaints with an eye towards resolving and preventing a protracted legal dispute, if possible, or if necessary, defending against litigation. Guidelines will be offered about when to submit a claim to the building’s insurance carrier, and how the carrier typically analyzes and determines coverage. Application is pending for Continuing Legal Education credit for this class.

CLASS LEVEL Intermediate

ATTENDING Board members, attorneys, and management personnel.

DISCUSSION CLASS

CONDOS ONLY

222. CONDO DISCUSSION: BRING ALL YOUR QUESTIONS

Here is your opportunity to set the direction of the class. Come with your questions of general interest about condo documents, about the organization (or dysfunction), about problems with neighbors, about construction flaws (see also Class E), about your responsibilities as board members (see also No. 2) and as unit-owners. Board president Barry Korn and attorneys Steven Sladkus and Jeffrey Reich will lead a discussion designed to explore issues of common concern and to help you find answers to your questions.

CLASS LEVEL Basic

ATTENDING Board members and aspiring board members of condominiums.

223. UNDERSTANDING YOUR HEATING SYSTEM

A clear understanding of how your heating system operates will help you make maximal use of your energy dollars. This class will take an in-depth look at the heating plant of buildings of between 20 and 1,000 apartments and examine their various servicing needs. Attention will be paid to boilers, burners, controls, and to inspection requirements. Experts Fredric Goldner and Asit Patel will provide practical facts and figures about the cost of maintaining and upgrading existing systems and advice about replacement of aging equipment.

CLASS LEVEL Basic

ATTENDING Board members, building operations committee members, green committee members, building staff, and management personnel. Board members, shareholders, finance committee members, accountants, and management personnel.

215. SENIORS IN THE SPOTLIGHT

Are there senior shareholders in your co-op/condo unable to care for themselves? Are there others with shaky finances? Simultaneously, are there seniors sharing (or ready to share) their strategies that have transformed their buildings from staid environments to ones which attract shareholders of all ages? Come and hear how senior activists Barbara Gottileb, Evelyn Jones Rich, Rochelle Shereff, and Fredda Vladeck have addressed these challenges and many more at Lincoln Towers, Lincoln Guild, and in Naturally Occurring Retirement Communities (NORCs) across the city.

CLASS LEVEL Basic

ATTENDING Board members, building residents, management personnel interested in helping seniors and tapping the abilities and insights of seniors in their cooperatives and condominiums.

216. THE BUDGET

Every well-run cooperative or condominium develops an annual budget to govern spending and to determine the amount of carrying charges that must be collected from each shareholder or unit-owner. The building manager, the accountant, and the treasurer should all participate in the development of your budget. Accountant Steven Beer will offer insights to help you establish and monitor a prudent budget and will provide tips to smooth out the impact of large seasonal expenses such as fuel and periodic ones (taxes, insurance, etc). Continuing Professional Education credit is available for accountants who take this class.

CLASS LEVEL Basic


ATTENDING Board members, finance committee members, accountants, and management personnel.

217. REASONABLE ACCOMMODATIONS: WHAT IS YOUR BUILDING REQUIRED TO DO?

Attorney Marc H. Schneider will discuss what your board should do when it receives a request for an accommodation or modification of the building based upon a medical necessity. His presentation will analyze the various laws applicable to such requests including the Fair Housing Act, the New York State Human Rights Law, and the New York City Human Rights Laws. Schneider will share advice to help your board avoid lawsuits and discrimination claims. He will discuss what to do when the request is first made; what can and what cannot be asked of the person making the request. He will also discuss who pays for any costs related to compliance with the request. Can a fee be charged for an accommodation? What should the board do if a formal complaint is filed? Is the claim covered by insurance? Plus other issues that boards face in connection with a request.

CLASS LEVEL Basic

ATTENDING Board members, attorneys, and management personnel.

218. ENFORCING THE RULES

A board’s power to impose rules on its community residents is the quintessential feature of cooperative and condominium living. Unfortunately, the exercise of that power often results in acrimony and costly litigation. Attorney Bruce Cholst will discuss strategies for enforcing the rules while minimizing tension and the prospect of litigation. If litigation is unavoidable, he will also explore a board’s powers and legal remedies in compelling compliance with their regulations. Bring along your house rules and horror stories to help make this an informative and interactive class. Application is pending for Continuing Legal Education credit for this class.

CLASS LEVEL Basic

ATTENDING Board members, aspiring board members, attorneys, and management personnel.

219. AMENITIES TO ENHANCE YOUR BUILDING

Building amenities benefit residents in many ways. Enhanced “curb appeal” and more facilities in the building foster a sense of community and enhance the quality of life. These same factors increase apartment value. Property manager Neil Davidowitz will lead a session on amenity options; it will cover methods for establishing priorities and effective ways to get resident input on the decision, and will then proceed from decision to implementation, including suggestions on applicable designs, budgets, fees, construction, and policies and procedures for the use of the new amenity. Architect Dennis Mele and storage expert Josh Goldman will provide insights regarding these amenities.

CLASS LEVEL Basic

ATTENDING Board members, house committee members, management personnel.

220. YOUR BUILDING’S SUPPORT TEAM: SUPER AND STAFF

Cooperatives and condominiums rely on staff to protect the building and its residents and to keep the physical plant running smoothly under the guidance of the superintendent. When things are not working as well as the board would like, advice and help are available through the Realty Advisory Board on Labor Relations, Inc. (RAB), which represents property owners in their dealings with service employees – both for day-to-day issues and in the negotiation and administration of contracts. RAB attorneys will suggest effective ways to deploy, motivate and, when necessary, discipline building employees, including a discussion of realistic expectations for your Super’s performance. Margie Russell, executive director of the New York Association of Realty Managers (NYARM) will provide insights on training staff, and suggestions for enhancing performance while also enhancing employee satisfaction.

CLASS LEVEL Basic

ATTENDING Board members, personnel committee members and management personnel.

221. NOISE COMPLAINTS: LEGAL AND INSURANCE PERSPECTIVES

Noise complaints constitute a significant portion of quality of life issues for residents within cooperatives and condominiums. This course will explore how boards and management can address noise complaints with an eye towards resolving and preventing a protracted legal dispute, if possible, or if necessary, defending against litigation. Guidelines will be offered about when to submit a claim to the building’s insurance carrier, and how the carrier typically analyzes and determines coverage. Application is pending for Continuing Legal Education credit for this class.

CLASS LEVEL Intermediate

ATTENDING Board members, attorneys, and management personnel.

DISCUSSION CLASS

CONDOS ONLY

222. CONDO DISCUSSION: BRING ALL YOUR QUESTIONS

Here is your opportunity to set the direction of the class. Come with your questions of general interest about condo documents, about the organization (or dysfunction), about problems with neighbors, about construction flaws (see also Class E), about your responsibilities as board members (see also No. 2) and as unit-owners. Board president Barry Korn and attorneys Steven Sladkus and Jeffrey Reich will lead a discussion designed to explore issues of common concern and to help you find answers to your questions.

CLASS LEVEL Basic

ATTENDING Board members and aspiring board members of condominiums.

223. UNDERSTANDING YOUR HEATING SYSTEM

A clear understanding of how your heating system operates will help you make maximal use of your energy dollars. This class will take an in-depth look at the heating plant of buildings of between 20 and 1,000 apartments and examine their various servicing needs. Attention will be paid to boilers, burners, controls, and to inspection requirements. Experts Fredric Goldner and Asit Patel will provide practical facts and figures about the cost of maintaining and upgrading existing systems and advice about replacement of aging equipment.

CLASS LEVEL Basic

ATTENDING Board members, building operations committee members, green committee members, building staff, and management personnel.

Ask the Experts

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Learn all the basics of NYC co-op and condo management, with straight talk from heavy hitters in the field of co-op or condo apartments

Professionals in some of the key fields of co-op and condo board governance and building management answer common questions in their areas of expertise

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